CFPC Policy Papers

The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) produces papers on health care, primary care and family medicine issues and policies.

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Subject
Format

…And still waiting. Exploring primary care wait times in Canada. Interim Statement.

Access to care is one of the most discussed issues facing the Canadian health care system. To provide more timely access to care, a succession of federal governments – followed by their provincial / territorial counterparts – have committed to wait time strategies that include wait time funding to support the achievement of wait time benchmarks and guarantees.

2008

Health Care Delivery

A Vision for Canada: Family Practice - The Patient's Medical Home (abridged version)

In October 2009, the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) presented its discussion paper Patient-Centred Primary Care in Canada: Bring it on Home.3 It described the pillars of a model of family practice focused on meeting patient needs.* Feedback from a broad cross-section of stakeholders including family physicians, other health professionals and their associations, governments, and the public provided important perspectives that are now incorporated into this vision paper describing family practices throughout Canada serving as Patients’ Medical Homes.

2011

A Vision for Canada: Family Practice - The Patient's Medical Home. Position Paper.

In October 2009, the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) presented its discussion paper Patient-Centred Primary Care in Canada: Bring it on Home. It described the pillars of a model of family practice focused on meeting patient needs. Feedback from a broad cross-section of stakeholders including family physicians, other health professionals and their associations, governments, and the public provided important perspectives that are now incorporated into this vision paper describing family practices throughout Canada serving as Patients’ Medical Homes.   

2011

Annual Physical Examination Practices by Province/Territory in Canada

The annual physical examination is known by multiple different names across Canada, including “comprehensive visit,” “complete physical examination,” or colloquially as a “check-up.” Given the extent of debate around the yearly physical, the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Department of Health Policy and Government Relations undertook an environmental scan of current practices across Canada.

2013

Health Care Delivery

Best Advice Guide: Panel Size

The objective of this tool is to provide a guide for Canadian family physicians on factors affecting practice panel size and the consideration of measures of performance and quality of care. Although, there is insufficient evidence to establish benchmarks or recommendations for the number of patients for which family physicians should be responsible, this resource acts as a Best Advice to: define panel size, provide approaches, identify factors that affect panel size, and address the measures that gauge performance.   

2011

Best Advice Guide: Patient Rostering in Family Practice

The objective of this paper is to provide guidance for Canadian family physicians who have already implemented or are considering patient rostering in their practices. The paper highlights the benefits and limitations of patient rostering and provides information to help physicians implement rostering in family practice.

2012

Physician-Patient Relations

CFPC Report Card Issue Briefing – Child Poverty

Access to care is one of the most discussed issues facing the Canadian health care system. To provide more timely access to care, a succession of federal governments – followed by their provincial / territorial counterparts – have committed to wait time strategies that include wait time funding to support the achievement of wait time benchmarks and guarantees.

2014

Family medicine in Canada: vision for the future.

Canada is facing a crisis. Timely access to health care services is getting progressively worse for Canadians. The single biggest reason for this is a severe shortage of health professionals. High on the list of those in short supply are family doctors. More than 4 million Canadians cannot find family physicians.

2004

Health Care Delivery

Family medicine maternity care: implications for the future.

 This paper is intended to inform The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), its members and other key stakeholders about the current state of family medicine maternity care across the country – in practice and in education / training.

2009

Maternity & Newborn Care

Family physicians and other specialists: Working and learning together. Conjoint Discussion Paper.

The CFPC and The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) addressed the issues surrounding the relationships between family physicians and other specialists in a two day Colloquium, with the goal of improving working and learning relationships to enhance patient care, and patient and physician satisfaction.

2006

Interprofessional Relations

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