CFPC Policy Papers

The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) produces papers on health care, primary care and family medicine issues and policies.

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Subject
Format

Primary care and family medicine in Canada: A prescription for renewal. Position Paper.

In this document the CFPC presents a model for delivery of primary care services by family doctors, nurses, and other health care providers and offers strategies and recommendations to both create and sustain this model. 

2000

Health Care Delivery

The role of the family physician in home care. A discussion paper.

Home care is not new to Canada. What is new is the rapid shift of acute care to the home setting. Increasingly, complex medical interventions are being transferred out of the hospital into the home without adequate consideration of medical management of the patient. In many parts of the country, the family physician has been largely excluded from home care planning and implementation. This is unfortunate as family doctors provide a large proportion of health care services in the community and are an important potential resource to enhance the effectiveness of home care.  

2000

Health Care Delivery

Family physicians caring for hospital inpatients. Discussion Paper.

This discussion paper has been written for family doctors, health professionals with whom they work, hospital administrators and managers, medical school leaders, the patients whom family doctors serve, and other public audiences interested in the value and importance of family doctors working in various health care environments.

2003

Hospitalists,

Health Care Delivery

Infant feeding. Policy Statement.

The benefits of breastfeeding have been well documented. Recognizing that breastfeeding plays an uniquely important role in the healthy development of infants and young children, The College of Family Physicians of Canada endorses The WHO Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding.

2004

Child & Adolescent Health Care

Family medicine in Canada: vision for the future.

Canada is facing a crisis. Timely access to health care services is getting progressively worse for Canadians. The single biggest reason for this is a severe shortage of health professionals. High on the list of those in short supply are family doctors. More than 4 million Canadians cannot find family physicians.

2004

Health Care Delivery

The role of the family doctor in public health and emergency preparedness. Discussion Paper.

This discussion paper examines the role of family medicine and family doctors in public health, including the part played by family doctors in health promotion, disease prevention, chronic disease management and, in particular, in preparing for and managing public health emergencies. In Canada, family doctors are the main providers of primary medical care and in the event of a public health emergency, are therefore integral to the timely delivery of critical medical services.

2005

Health Care Delivery

Wait times. Position Statement.

All Canadians should be given an opportunity to have a family doctor to ensure universal access to medically necessary health care services.  Each province/territory must ensure care is provided for its population within the pan-Canadian wait times benchmarks and targets.  Standardized pan-Canadian criteria defining eligibility of patients to be entered onto wait lists must be developed by an expert panel, including family physicians.

2005

Health Care Delivery

Family physicians and other specialists: Working and learning together. Conjoint Discussion Paper.

The CFPC and The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) addressed the issues surrounding the relationships between family physicians and other specialists in a two day Colloquium, with the goal of improving working and learning relationships to enhance patient care, and patient and physician satisfaction.

2006

Interprofessional Relations

When the clock starts ticking: Wait times in primary care. Discussion Paper.

For many years the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) has advocated on behalf of Canadians for appropriate and timely access to all aspects of health care through their family physicians. The College’s positions have taken into account the needs of Canadians as patients waiting in line to receive services throughout the continuum of their health care. This includes not just the wait time between the first visit with a consulting specialist and the patient’s definitive procedure, surgery or treatment – but also the time between the patient’s first visit with his/her family physician and when required, a subsequent visit with a consultant. It also includes the time it takes for a Canadian who does not have a family physician to find one. 

2006

Health Care Delivery

Vision Statement on Inter-Professional Care.

 The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) believes that patients must be at the centre of health care. The CFPC has agreed to the following Vision Statement on Interprofessional Care.  

2007

Interprofessional Relations

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