Published Reports

These reports and  policy papers have been published by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC).  Can’t find a document? Some older documents are not listed online, but may be kept on file. Contact us.



141 Results | Viewing 31 to 40

Type
Subject
Format

Defining core procedure skills for Canadian family medicine training

The CFPC commissioned a Working Group on Procedural Skills to create a core and enhanced list of skills to guide residents’ training. This is the first list generated from suggestions of family physicians in practice.

2005

Education Document/Report

Medical Education

The role of the family doctor in public health and emergency preparedness. Discussion Paper.

This discussion paper examines the role of family medicine and family doctors in public health, including the part played by family doctors in health promotion, disease prevention, chronic disease management and, in particular, in preparing for and managing public health emergencies. In Canada, family doctors are the main providers of primary medical care and in the event of a public health emergency, are therefore integral to the timely delivery of critical medical services.

2005

CFPC Policy Paper

Health Care Delivery

Wait times. Position Statement.

All Canadians should be given an opportunity to have a family doctor to ensure universal access to medically necessary health care services.  Each province/territory must ensure care is provided for its population within the pan-Canadian wait times benchmarks and targets.  Standardized pan-Canadian criteria defining eligibility of patients to be entered onto wait lists must be developed by an expert panel, including family physicians.

2005

CFPC Policy Paper

Health Care Delivery

Pan-Canadian physical activity strategy.

CAL is a national action group of more than 100 organizations committed to making sure that the environments where we live, learn, commute, work and play support regular physical activity. CAL is working to achieve this goal by advocating for public policies that support physical activity.

2006

Endorsed Document

Preventive Care

Policy on rural practice and rural health 2001.

This Policy on Rural Practice and Rural Health contains strategies to assist governments and professional bodies to ensure that real progress is made toward the goal of improving the health of rural people. These strategies were developed over the six year period following the establishment of the WONCA Working Pa

2006

Endorsed Document

Rural Practice,

Health Care Delivery

An approach to maternity care education for Canadian family medicine residents. Discussion Paper.

Approach to maternity care education for Canadian family medicine residents. Competence in maternity and newborn care is a prerequisite for Certification in Family Medicine in Canada. 

2006

Education Document/Report

Maternity & Newborn Care,

Medical Education

An environmental scan of practice-based research networks in Canada as of May 2006.

 The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) commissioned this environmental scan with a view to ascertaining the range of practice-based research network (PBRN) activity among primary care providers across the country as well as the diversity of health care research networks.

2006

Research Document/Report

Family physicians and other specialists: Working and learning together. Conjoint Discussion Paper.

The CFPC and The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) addressed the issues surrounding the relationships between family physicians and other specialists in a two day Colloquium, with the goal of improving working and learning relationships to enhance patient care, and patient and physician satisfaction.

2006

CFPC Policy Paper

Interprofessional Relations

When the clock starts ticking: Wait times in primary care. Discussion Paper.

For many years the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) has advocated on behalf of Canadians for appropriate and timely access to all aspects of health care through their family physicians. The College’s positions have taken into account the needs of Canadians as patients waiting in line to receive services throughout the continuum of their health care. This includes not just the wait time between the first visit with a consulting specialist and the patient’s definitive procedure, surgery or treatment – but also the time between the patient’s first visit with his/her family physician and when required, a subsequent visit with a consultant. It also includes the time it takes for a Canadian who does not have a family physician to find one. 

2006

CFPC Policy Paper

Health Care Delivery

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