Communication Skills with Colleagues

To generate individual observable behaviour specific field notes, click on the theme link for the desired behaviour.

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Theme
Many specific listening skills are better assessed in the context of communication with patients. Some are well assessed in the context of communication with colleagues.
Adequate to be understood in face-to-face communication, and with all other commonly used methods (e.g., phone, video conferencing, etc.); adequate to understand complex profession-specific conversation; appropriate for colleagues with different backgrounds, professions, and education; appropriate tone for the situation, to ensure good communication and colleague comfort
(e.g., hospital and office charting, consultant letter, lawyer letter)
  • Clearly articulates and communicates thoughts in a written fashion
  • Has spelling, grammar, legibility, and punctuation that are adequate to facilitate understanding
Assessment should concentrate mainly on the charting of individual encounters. Overall organization and structure of the ongoing clinical record are important, but these are often predetermined and outside the control of the individual—they can be assessed, but in a different context. Note that these charting skills are formatted as a set of key features.
Appropriate eye contact, respectful of others’ personal space, appropriate demeanour (e.g., pleasant, smiles appropriately, appropriately serious, attentive, patient and empathetic), and conscious of the impact of body language on the colleague
Aware of and responsive to body language, especially as seen with dissatisfaction; correctly interprets signs of feelings not expressed, such as anger and frustration
Culture and Age Appropriateness
Not assessed in this format. There may be instances where communication with colleagues and other team members from different cultural backgrounds can be problematic. Awareness of these potential problems and subsequent adjustments to communication are elements of competence. This, however, is better assessed in the context of communication with patients and in professionalism.
This permeates all levels of communication. Competent family physicians possess an attitude that allows them to respectfully hear, understand, and discuss an opinion, idea, or value that may be different from their own.
To generate individual observable behaviour specific field notes, click on the theme link for the desired behaviour.

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