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You searched by Patient Education.

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Acne in teens: ways to control it.

What causes acne? Most people who get acne start having it in their early teens. This is when the oil glands in the body start making more sebum (oil). Some people also have too many "sticky" skin cells. In people with acne, these cells mix with the oil and plug up the hair follicles in the skin.

2008

Patient Information

Child & Adolescent Health Care,

Patient Education

Anemia

Anemia is a condition that affects your red blood cells. It occurs when your blood doesn't have enough hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells that carries oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Anemia can starve your body of the...

2011

Patient Information

Patient Education

    Asthma: Learning to control your symptoms.

    This information provides a general overview on this topic and may not apply to everyone. To find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject, talk to your family doctor.

    2014

    Patient Information

    Patient Education,

    Respiratory Disorders

    At my best.

    The rates of physical inactivity and obesity among Canadian children are alarming. Let’s work together to teach kids how to make healthier choices today and develop lifelong healthy habits.

    2008

    Endorsed Document,

    Patient Information

    Child & Adolescent Health Care,

    Patient Education

    Breast cancer - steps to finding breast lumps early.

    How can I find breast cancer early?  The best way to find breast lumps that may be cancer is to do two things: Have regular mammograms. Have your doctor check your breasts every year. Doing both gives you the best chance to find cancer as early as you can.  

    2015

    Patient Information

    Cancer,

    Patient Education,

    Women’s Health

    Childhood vaccines - what they are and why your child needs them

    What is a vaccine? A vaccine is a medicine that's given to help prevent a disease. Vaccines help the body produce antibodies. These antibodies protect against the disease. Vaccines are given by injection (a "shot") or by mouth. Each province in Canada has its own schedule of vaccines for children.

    2007

    Patient Information

    Child & Adolescent Health Care,

    Immunization,

    Patient Education

      Choosing Wisely and Prevention Through Primary Care

      Our multimedia-friendly toolkit equips health care providers with user-friendly videos, printable posters for their clinics, and printable infographics designed to facilitate informed discussions and give patients resources they can take home.

      2017

      Patient Information

      Patient Education,

      Periodic Health Examination

        Depression - you don't have to feel this way

         When doctors talk about depression, they usually mean major depression. Someone with major depression has five of the symptoms like those listed in the box below nearly every day, all day, for two weeks or...

        2010

        Patient Information

        Mental Health,

        Patient Education

          Diabetes - taking charge of your diabetes.

          What is diabetes? Diabetes occurs when a person's body doesn't make enough insulin or doesn't use insulin the right way. Insulin helps your cells use blood sugar for energy. Diabetes causes the sugar to build up in your blood.

          2007

          Patient Information

          Diabetes,

          Patient Education

          Fever in Infants and Children

          What is a normal temperature? A normal temperature is about 37°C (98°F) when taken orally (by mouth). Temperatures taken rectally (by rectum) usually run 0.5°C higher than those taken...

          2011

          Patient Information

          Child & Adolescent Health Care,

          Patient Education

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